“Sen. Markey Leads Bipartisan Call To Launch Major Children’s Privacy Investigation” via Framingham Source

This article describes the efforts by Senators Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.), Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Bill Cassidy (R-La.), Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), and Marsha Blackburn (R-Tenn.) to begin a review of the Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA). The senators wrote a letter to the FTC urging it to use its authority found under 6(b) of the FTC Act to develop an understanding of industry practices related to collecting of information from children.

“Analysis: Recovery From Coronavirus Shutdowns Hinges on Good Data. What the Federal Government Can Do to Help States and Schools” via The 74

In this article appearing in The 74, Jennifer Bell-Ellwanger, President and CEO of Data Quality Campaign, describes some of the ways in which Congress can solve difficult educational challenges resulting from COVID-19. She notes that the effective use of student data at the local and state levels can give leaders the information needed to make informed decisions with the goal of improving educational outcomes.

Issues with USDOE’s handling of FERPA complaints is worse than the DOE has stated.

In an update to a previous post, an internal inspector found that the U.S. Department of Education’s handling of FERPA complaints are even worse than the USDOE has admitted. (Also, check this source, too.) The inspector pointed to years of unresolved cases, ineffective tracking of complaints, and the status of complaints that have been received.

Another source – Education Week’s story.

More details forethcoming.

“Judge delays sentencing over cell phone privacy issue: U.S. Supreme Court ruled in June on cell tracking” via WTMZ-TV News

This article talks about a judge’s decision to reanalyze a robbery case in light of the Supreme Courts ruling on cell phone tracking in June, 2018. 

The defendant was located using “cell-site records for any wireless, internet-enable device connected to the college’s wireless network.” The school has 1,300 antenna which can be used to track a student’s location as they move around campus.

The judge originally rules that because the “Moravian College student handbook make it clear that any connections made to the campus wireless network are subject to inspection by the school at any time,” the tracking evidence would be allowed.

This NPR article details the Supreme Court ruling, which requires police to obtain a warrant to track a person using location data from a cellular device.