“Analysis: Recovery From Coronavirus Shutdowns Hinges on Good Data. What the Federal Government Can Do to Help States and Schools” via The 74

In this article appearing in The 74, Jennifer Bell-Ellwanger, President and CEO of Data Quality Campaign, describes some of the ways in which Congress can solve difficult educational challenges resulting from COVID-19. She notes that the effective use of student data at the local and state levels can give leaders the information needed to make informed decisions with the goal of improving educational outcomes.

“Youth advocates in North Carolina urge state superintendent to take action” via notes

This article by Lainey Millen documents efforts by parents, administrators, teachers, and students to “take action that would protect the privacy and safety of transgender students” in North Carolina. The concern is that the way North Carolina uses their online platform PowerSchool may cause transgender students to be vulnerable to having their privacy violated. Other states’ implementation of PowerSchool does not include design choices that risks student privacy the way North Carolina does.

“Directory information battle continues between school district, guardians” via Reno Nevada Gazette Journal

This article discusses and grandparent’s desire to prohibit a school board from sharing his granddaughter’s directory with outside groups, such as a church, while still having her involved in school activities, such as yearbooks, class pictures, graduation programs, the honor roll, sports activities, and theatre programs.

“For Sale: Survey Data on Millions of High School Students” via New York Times

The New York Times ran this article about invitations that high school students received to attend an event called the Congress of Future Science and Technology Leaders. Many students received this invitation because they filled out a school-provided survey that the students believed would help them get scholarships for college.

  • Should states require schools to have opt-in or opt-out options for such surveys? What are the benefits of each?
  • Who should have to provide the opt-in/out, students or parents? What benefit is there to allowing students to choose to opt-in/out as opposed to parents? What concerns?